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Tag: Szymon Górnicki

Szymon is a freelance palaeoartist from Kalisz, Poland. In 2013, he graduated from the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland, having published a paper on ‘The morphology of hind limb of an Aetosaur from documentation post “Triassic” in Krasiejów’”. He was a member of the Students’ Palaeontological society UAM. He has a passion for palaeontology and the history of palaeoart. He is the author of several articles about palaeoart. A characteristic part of his creative work is satirical palaeontological drawings. Currently, he’s involved in writing articles and continues working on creating palaeontological artworks for various reasons, which are published on his website at: http://www.szymongornicki.com/

Apart from palaeontology and palaeoart, he’s interested in special effects in movies and model building.

Contact Details:

Szymon Górnicki, freelance palaeoartist, Kalisz, Poland. Email: sgornicki@o2.pl

Education and Outreach: The history of dinosaur palaeoart

Education and Outreach: The history of dinosaur palaeoart

Education and Outreach
by Szymon Górnicki*1 Introduction: Non-avian dinosaurs are iconic animals that dominated life on land for 170 million years during the Mesozoic era, and have captured the imagination of scientists and non-scientists alike for as long as we have known about them. As a result, dinosaurs have also dominated palaeoart — artistic representations of past life. Palaeoart is closely linked to the science of palaeontology, resulting from the desire to reconstruct what extinct organisms looked like when they were alive, and is increasingly informed by the latest scientific discoveries. This article provides a brief historical account of dinosaur palaeoart, explaining how this work has changed as our understanding of the anatomy and biology of dinosaurs has improved. Scaled-up lizards: The first
Education and Outreach: Dinosaurs in the movies

Education and Outreach: Dinosaurs in the movies

Education and Outreach
by Szymon Górnicki*1 Introduction: Dinosaurs fit perfectly into the role of movie monsters: many were enormous, or had distinctive characteristics such as spikes, horns, claws and big teeth. The fact that they aren’t found in the modern world (except for birds) excites the imagination, and films represent some of the few opportunities to see them as they may have looked when they were alive. It’s not surprising that the history of movies featuring dinosaurs goes back more than 100 years. The cinematographic rise of the dinosaurs: The first moving picture featuring dinosaurs was Prehistoric Peeps (1905), an adaptation of a cartoon with the same name. The film launched the popular trend of showing primitive humans and non-avian dinosaurs living alongside one another, even though the foss